Managed Agile Development Framework

I’ve seen many people ask a question like “should I use Agile or Waterfall for a project? That presumes that this is a binary, all-or-nothing choice that you have to choose one or the other and not both. It excludes the possibility that there is a hybrid approach that provides the benefits of both approaches. The Managed Agile Development Framework is an example of a hybrid approach that is very easy to implement

A few years ago I was responsible for managing a large government project that required meeting some defined cost and schedule milestones but the customer wanted to take an Agile approach to defining the requirements. In response to that project, I developed an approach which I call “The Managed Agile Development” framework that would satisfy those two seemingly inconsistent goals.

  • We were able to successfully build a partnership with the government client in which we did a very professional job of managing overall contractual requirements at the “macro-level”, and
  • Within that “macro level” envelope, we were still able to implement a fairly Agile development approach at the “micro-level”

Managed Agile Development Framework

I’m providing a brief description of how it works here (refer to my book for more details). There are two layers in the framework as shown in the diagram above. The “Macro” layer is plan-driven; but it can be as “thick” or “thin” as you want it to be. The “Micro” layer can be any Agile development approach such as Scrum.

  • The macro-level framework is a plan-driven approach, designed to provide a sufficient level of control and predictability for the overall project. It defines the outer envelope (scope and high-level requirements) that the project operates within
  • Within that outer envelope, the micro-level framework utilizes a more flexible and iterative approach based on an Agile Scrum approach that is designed to be adaptive to user needs

Naturally, there are tradeoffs between the level of agility and flexibility to adapt to change at the “micro-level” and the level of predictability and control at the “macro-level”. It is important that both the client or business sponsor and the development team need to agree on those tradeoffs. The framework provides a mechanism for making those tradeoffs by making the “macro-level” as “thick” or “thin” as you want to fit a given situation.

  • Increasing the level of predictability and control requires beefing up the macro-level and providing more detailed requirements at that level and implementing at least a limited amount of change control
  • To increase the level of agility, you can simply eliminate the macro-level altogether or limit it to only very high-level requirements
  • Other elements of the framework can be easily customized or eliminated depending on the scope and complexity of the project and other factors

A question that often comes up is “How do you handle change control?”. The answer to that question is that you have to design enough slack into the milestones at the “macro” level to allow detailed elaboration of requirements to take place in the “micro” level. However, when there is a significant enough change in the “micro” level that would impact achievement of the requirements in the “macro” level, that should trigger a change to the “macro” level milestones. This general approach can be used on almost any project.

Check out my online training courses to learn more about developing a hybrid Agile approach and some case studies that show how it has been used successfully.

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