Tag Archives: Agile Pendulum

The Agile Project Management Pendulum

The original Agile movement started out as a revolution against the traditional Waterfall methodology which was viewed as very cumbersome, bureaucratic, and inflexible. The need for that revolution was absolutely correct – an Agile approach does offer many advantages where a more adaptive approach is needed; particularly in environments where the requirements are very uncertain and subject to change. However, as in many other revolutions, there’s often a tendency for The Agile Project Management Pendulum to swing too far in the opposite direction to make a correction.

Agile Project Management Pendulum

In particular, a lot of polarization has developed between some people in the Agile community and people in the more traditional project management community.

  • There are many agilists who are entrenched in their perspective that the only way to be “agile” is strictly “by the book” and that there is no need for project management at all – they see project management as a role rather than a set of principles that can be adapted to a broad range of different environments, just as the agile principles can also be applied to a broad range of different environments
  • There are some project managers who are equally entrenched in thinking that traditional, plan-driven, control-oriented approaches are the only way to do project management and have not learned how to integrate an Agile approach into their overall toolkit

The pendulum has begun to swing back towards the middle a bit and there’s less polarization today than there was several years ago, but some of that bias still does exist on both sides of this fence. Some of the progress that has been made over the past few years has been:

  • PMI has recognized the need for integrating an Agile approach with a traditional project management approach and has begun moving in that direction with the PMI-ACP (Agile Certified Practitioner) certification. Although it is a step in the right direction, it doesn’t go far enough, in my opinion. It doesn’t really address the larger question of how a project manager would go about blending together Agile and traditional plan-driven principles and practices in a real-world situation and what role a Project Manager would play in an Agile project to use this knowledge.Is the PMI-ACP certification PMI’s answer to the Agile CSM certification? That would imply that the goal of the PMI-ACP exam would be to compete with CSM and train project managers for the Scrum Master role and I don’t believe that makes sense at all. The only way it makes sense, in my opinion, is for a Project Manager to take on a higher-level role in larger projects that require blending together some traditional plan-driven and Agile principles and practices in the right proportions to fit the situation, but that role is somewhat undefined at this point and also not necessarily widely understood and accepted.

     

  • As Agile begins to be utilized for larger and more complex, enterprise-level projects; there is an increased recognition in the Agile community that an Agile development process like Scrum that works very well at the team level doesn’t necessarily scale very well without some kind of overall management framework and several different frameworks have been developed to fill this need.
    1. The Scaled Agile Framework developed by Dean Leffingwell is an example of a relatively complete approach that incorporates higher levels of project and program management as well as project portfolio management into an overall framework that is fairly Agile from top-to-bottom; however, it is not easy to implement and would typically require a very major transformation for a company to adopt that kind of approach.
    2. For companies who want to integrate an Agile development approach at the team level into a more traditional management framework, the Managed Agile Development approach defined in my latest book and Scott Ambler’s Disciplined Agile Delivery framework are both alternatives that can be used in a more traditional management environment.

It’s time to get past the polarization that has existed in the past and begin to see Agile and plan-driven approaches as complementary to each other, rather than competitive. It’s not an “either-or”, “black-and-white” alternative to adopt an Agile or Waterfall approach as some people have portrayed it; it’s more of a continuous spectrum of alternatives offering different levels of control and adaptivity as needed to fit a given situation. That’s the challenge I’ve tried to take on in my two books on this subject.