Tag Archives: Agile Maturity

Is Agile Like the Steam Engine?

Is Agile Like the Steam Engine? I recently participated in a LinkedIn discussion in which the author of the discussion made a statement that “Agile is by definition a software development methodology”. I didn’t agree with that statement at all…Its unfortunate that the word “Agile” has acquired that connotation in actual usage by a number of people but that’s just sloppy use of terminology (similar to the sloppy use of the word “Waterfall” that I’ve talked about) and its also somewhat narrow thinking.

The author of that discussion defended his statement that “Agile is by definition a software development methodology” by saying that “The Agile Manifesto starts with these words ‘We are uncovering better ways of developing software'”. That statement doesn’t work either in my opinion – I’m sure that was a key motivator behind creating the Agile Manifesto but that was in 2001 which was 12-13 years ago and our concept of what Agile is has grown significantly since that time.

I was trying to think of a good analogy to illustrate this point and somehow I thought of the steam engine. The steam engine was originally invented in 1698 by Thomas Savery who was working on the problem of how to pump water out of coal mines. Thomas Newcomen improved on the design but it wasn’t until Scotsman James Watt improved on the steam engine in the second half of the 18th century that it became truly a viable piece of machinery that helped start the industrial revolution. Even though that started the industrial revolution across the whole world, very few people in the 1700’s would likely imagine that that was only the beginning and the same principles originally used to use to pump water out of coal mines would have a much broader usage in the future including powering nuclear power plants.

(Source: http://americanhistory.about.com/od/industrialrev/p/steamengine.htm)

I think Agile is very similar…

  • The roots of Agile go back a lot further than 2001 – you can very easily trace the roots of Agile to TQM and Lean Manufacturing long before 2001 and the evolution of iterative methodologies like RUP certainly also had an influence. The period prior to 2001 was probably equivalent to pumping water out of coal mines
  • Learning to apply The Agile principles to software development in the Agile Manifesto in 2001 was a real breakthrough that is probably similar to James Watt learning how to apply steam to operate industrial machinery that started the industrial revolution across the world. It had major impact, but that was only the beginning
  • Just as James Watt probably never envisioned the use of steam power in nuclear power plants, the signers of the Agile Manifesto probably never fully envisioned widespread implementation of those principles in many other areas beyond software development

In common usage, some people think that the word “Agile” only applies to software development; to other people, the definition is even narrower and you’re only truly Agile if you’re doing Scrum and doing it strictly by the book with no variation. in my opinion, this really is just sloppy use of terminology and narrow thinking in how the word “Agile” is being used. Our understanding of what “Agile” is is still at a very early stage probably very similar to when James Watt learned how to apply steam technology to operate industrial machinery and limiting our thinking about what “Agile” is may prevent us from imagining new applications and ways of using Agile principles and practices that no one has even dreamed of yet.

Agile and Lessons Learned From the Martial Arts

I was engaged in a discussion on LinkedIn that made me think about the relationship of Agile and lessons learned from the martial arts like Karate – in theory, there should be a lot of similarity:

  • Techniques – There are a wide range of Martial Arts techniques that can be applied in different situations
  • Finesse and Skill – Most Martial Arts require finesse and skill; it’s not just a brute force approach
  • Levels of Skill – There are different levels of skill associated with Martial Arts and it is an ongoing journey to become a “master”

In actual practice; however, I think that Agile principles and practices are at a very low level of maturity compared to Martial Arts (that’s perfectly understandable given that Martial Arts have been around for thousands of years); however, there is a lot we can learn from martial arts that can be applied to Agile:

  • Techniques – Agile has become synonymous with Scrum as the primary methodology for implementing Agile and our knowledge of implementing Agile successfully is heavily defined by the “mechanics” of how to implement Scrum. Surely, there must be more to Agile than that. That’s equivalent to saying that Karate is the only Martial Arts practice when there are many, many others.
  • Finesse and Skill – I’ve seen many companies take a very superficial approach to Agile. They will do a few Agile practices like holding Daily Standups and putting up Kanban Boards and call it Agile. In many cases, if you look under the surface, it’s still just a brute force approach to get things done. They haven’t really fully implemented Agile principles and practices and they haven’t mastered the skill and finesse needed to do it well.
    • People may not be dedicated to Agile teams
    • The company may still rely on overtime, weekend work, and pressure to meet unrealistic deadlines
    • There may be no Product Owner role and the business side may not be well-integrated with the project
  • Levels of Skill – Many people don’t seem to realize that there are different levels of skill associated with Agile (some of those levels aren’t even fully understood yet).
    • There is a wealth of knowledge about how to do almost every aspect of Scrum at the team level but very little is understood about how to scale Agile to an enterprise level and how to integrate it with a business environment that isn’t necessarily well-suited to Agile.
    • There are also still very wide gaps in our understanding of how to blend Agile principles and practices with more traditional project management principles and practices which are often seen as competitive rather than complementary with Agile.

There’s a particular concept from Martial Arts that is helpful to understand the level of maturity we are at in Agile. The concept of “Shu-ha-ri” is a Japanese concept to define different levels of proficiency in Martial Arts:

    • “Shu” means to keep, protect, keep or maintain. During the “Shu” phase, the student builds the technical foundation of the art.
      In “Shu”, the student should be working to copy the techniques as taught without modification and without yet attempting to make any effort to understand the rationale of the techniques of the school/teacher. In this way, a lasting technical foundation is built on which the deeper understanding of the art can be based
    • “Ha” is the second stage of the process. “Ha” means to detach and means that the student breaks free from traditions to some extent.
      In the “Ha” stage, the student must reflect on the meaning and purpose of everything that s/he has learned and thus come to a deeper understanding of the art than pure repetitive practice can allow.
    • “Ri” means to go beyond or transcend. In this stage, the student is no longer a student in the normal sense, but a practitioner.
      The practitioner must think originally and develop from background knowledge original thoughts about the art and test them against the reality of his or her background knowledge and conclusions as well as the demands of everyday life. In the Ri stage, the art truly becomes the practitioner’s own and to some extent his or her own creation.

(Source: Shu-Ha-Ri http://www.aikidofaq.com/essays/tin/shuhari.html)

If you think about our current level of knowledge of Agile as it exists today, I think many people are still struggling with the “Shu” level to understand the mechanics of how to do Scrum and have a long way to go to really get to higher levels of mastery. I’m not sure how many people realize how big this gap is between where we are now and where we need to get to. I think there are many people who seem to think that all there is to know is the mechanics of how to do Scrum at the team level and I think we have hardly scratched the surface of the knowledge that is needed to be known about how to successfully do Agile Project Management.

Martial Arts have been around for thousands of years and there’s still a lot to be learned so its very understandable that our level of knowledge about Agile is at a fairly low level of maturity. For example, here is a very good article written by Patti Gilchrist on the innovations that Bruce Lee has brought to Martial Arts that has some similar thoughts to this article that I really liked: http://www.projectmanagement.com/articles/278838/Of-Martial-Arts-and-Methodology