Category Archives: PMI-ACP Certification

What’s Next After PMI-ACP Certification and What’s the Future Like?

What’s next after PMI-ACP certification? Over the past few years I’ve been progressively developing a new approach for PMI-ACP training that I think goes well beyond other training programs and lays the groundwork for what I see as the future of project management.

What's Next After PMI-ACP Certification?

Training Objectives

When I set out to develop this training, I wanted to try to anticipate the future of the project management profession and take a different approach to Agile Project Management and PMI-ACP Certification training. There were several objectives that were important goals:

  • Not a typical “exam prep” course. There are a lot of courses out there that are based on what I call an “exam cram” approach that is designed to get students through the PMI-ACP exam and not much more than that. It involves a lot of memorization of information which doesn’t generally lead to a deeper and lasting understanding of the material.
  • Go beyond the PMI-ACP exam. Although the PMI-ACP exam is a challenging exam, it doesn’t go far enough in my opinion. It is primarily just a test of general Lean and Agile knowledge and it doesn’t address one of the biggest challenges that a project manager faces of learning how to blend Agile and traditional, plan-driven project management in the right proportions to fit a given situation. PMI still treats Agile and traditional, plan-driven project management as separate and independent domains of knowledge with little or no integration between the two. It is left up to the individual project manager to figure out how to put the two together.
  • Design the training around a real-world role. The PMI-ACP certification is not designed around preparing someone for a particular job role. I think it’s important for a project manager to have a clear idea of what role that he/she might play as an Agile Project Manager in order to prepare him/herself for that role. I think that’s particularly important since the role of an Agile Project Manager is not well-defined and it is even somewhat controversial among some people that there is a legitimate role for a project manager to play in an Agile environment.
  • Avoid the limitations of some typical Agile training. A lot of Agile training that is out there (like the typical CSM training) is very superficial in my opinion. The typical Agile training focuses on the “mechanics” of how to do Agile and really doesn’t go into the principles behind it very much at all. Agile is intended to be adaptive but in order to take an adaptive approach, you have to understand the principles behind it in order to know how to adapt it to fit a given situation.  Doing it very mechanically is not very adaptive.

What’s the Future Like?

In order to see why I think this training makes so much sense, we need to make some assumptions about where the future of the project management profession is heading. I believe that many aspects of traditional, plan-driven project management have not changed significantly since the 1950’s and 1960’s and we’re on the verge of a very major change.  What does that change look like? I don’t believe traditional, plan-driven project management will ever become obsolete. It definitely has a well-established role in some industries like construction that lend themselves to a plan-driven approach and require some level of predictability over costs and schedules. However,

  • Even in industries like construction, project managers are starting to learn how to take a more adaptive approach
  • In many other industries and application areas that have a high level of uncertainty that requires a more adaptive approach to project management, a project manager who only knows how to do a traditional, plan-driven project management approach and tries to force-fit all projects to that approach will have some serious limitations

We need to adopt a broader view of what “project management” is – force-fitting all projects to a traditional, plan-driven project management approach is just not very effective any more.

This broader vision of “project management” is not limited to someone who can take a project with well-defined requirements and plan and manage it to meet cost and schedule goals.  This new vision of Agile Project Management includes taking on an effort with some very broadly-defined business objectives in a very dynamic and uncertain environment and developing and defining and leading a project management approach that is designed to maximize the business value of the overall solution.

That means an Agile Project Manager needs to learn how to blend Agile and traditional plan-driven principles and practices in the right proportions to fit the situation.  And, even if a project manager is never involved in a true Agile project, it will make him/her a much stronger project manager by broadening the range of project management capabilities that he/she has to offer.  That’s where I see the future of project management going and that’s exactly how the online Agile Project Management training I’ve developed is designed.

Check out this new training curriculum in The Agile Project Management Academy.

Agile Project Management Academy

I am very pleased to announce the opening of the Agile Project Management Academy! The Agile Project Management Academy is an online school that is dedicated to helping project managers and other students learn how to successfully integrate Agile and traditional plan-driven project management principles and practices in the right proportions to fit any situation and to develop a very high impact and adaptive project management approach that provides the best of those two worlds.

You can enroll in the Agile Project Management Academy at no charge by clicking this link. There is no obligation to purchase a course if you enroll in the school and enrolling in the school will keep you informed of new courses and discount offers that become available. You can also enroll in either of these two free courses to try it out with no obligation:

Any of my Udemy students will recognize the courses in the Agile Project Management Academy as courses that have been offered on Udemy that have drawn over 10,000 students and over 300 5-star reviews. I will continue to offer these courses on Udemy; however, offering these courses through the Agile Project Management Academy creates some new opportunities that were not available on the Udemy platform. The new platform provides:

  • A dedicated focus on Agile Project Management that will help students realize the full benefits of these courses in a much more integrated environment
  • More ways for students to take courses including bundled discounts and subscriptions
  • Much more capabilities for direct communication with students to create a more interactive learning experience
  • The ability to integrate courses from other providers with my own courses to provide a more complete learning experience
  • Better and more timely support for students

I hope you enjoy this new capability! I am very excited to make it available! Enrollment in the school is free and anyone who registers in the school will receive email updates of new courses as well as enhancements to existing courses. You can enroll in the school at no charge here:

Agile Project Management Academy

You can find a summary of the courses that are offered as well as some discount coupons for all of the courses here:

Course Summaries and Discount Coupons

Please send me an email if you have any questions or comments on this new capability:

Send email to Chuck

For any student who has previously purchased one of my courses through Udemy, I will be happy to provide access to the equivalent course in the new Agile Project Management Academy at no charge. If you would like to take advantage of that offer, just send me an email.

What Certification Should I Get?

I’ve gotten lots of questions from students in my Agile Project Management training along the lines of “What certification should I get?”. It’s understandable that there’s a lot of confusion about this because there is so much change going on in this area and it can be somewhat of a moving target to decide where to take your career direction; however, I’m not a big fan of chasing after certifications and I’d like to share some of my thoughts on that subject…

First, a lot of people seem to view a certification as a “ticket to get a new job”…For example, almost anyone can get a Certified Scrum Master (CSM) certification if they can pay the money to sit through a 2-day training course. And, various training companies have done their best to promote this idea in order to sell their training courses. There are literally hundreds of what I call “exam-cram” courses out there that are designed to get you through a certification exam and little more than that. I don’t think that’s healthy – it does a disservice to the profession and to the people getting those certifications.

I think a better way to view a certification is evidence that you already have an acceptable level of knowledge, skills, as well as actual experience to perform a given job. Unfortunately, that’s not universally true in the way many certifications are designed and implemented in the real world, but that’s a better way to look at certifications in my opinion.

Here’s the approach I recommend to my students:

  1. Get a good base of knowledge to make a sensible decision of what you think is the best career direction for yourself. This is not an easy thing to do because the whole area associated with Agile and; in particular, Agile Project Management is rapidly evolving and the roles in this area are also changing and evolving. It can be a moving target to try to plan your career direction in this environment.
  2. Once you’ve made a decision on your most logical career direction, work on developing some more knowledge that is specific to that career direction
  3. Acquire some real world job knowledge from working in that role
  4. Decide what certification is most relevant to that role and get a certification to show that you have the appropriate knowledge, skills, and experience to do that job

A lot of people seem to want to short-circuit this process and just go out and get a certification and get a job and I think that could be a big mistake without doing steps 1-3 above first.

All of the Agile Project Management training courses I’ve developed are designed around helping people take a sensible approach to exactly this problem but you have to realize that it’s not just a matter of taking an “exam-prep” course and then going out and taking a certification exam. My courses are not really designed to be “exam prep” courses – they go beyond that and try to focus on the knowledge and skills to do the job in the real world. You can find information plus current discount coupons on all of my courses here:

http://agileprojectmanagementacademy.com/courses

In particular, my “How to Prepare for PMI-ACP Certification” course is a free course and has some very good information to compare various certifications related to Agile and Agile Project Management. If you have any questions about your own career direction, feel free to send me an email and I’ll be glad to help:

Send email to Chuck

How to Prepare for PMI-ACP Certification

I think there is a lot of confusion among project managers about how to prepare for PMI-ACP certification – some people may think that:

  1. Getting PMI-ACP certification is a matter of buying an “exam prep” book or taking an “exam prep” training course and then going out and taking the exam, and
  2. Once you’ve taken and passed the exam, that is your “ticket” to get a job working in an Agile environment as a project manager

Both of those assumptions are far from reality, in my opinion:

  1. You can’t just do some “exam prep” training and/or buy an “exam prep” book and go out and pass the exam for several reasons:
    • PMI won’t allow that – PMI requires a  minimum of 1,500 hours of working in an Agile environment before you can even apply to take the exam
    • There’s such a broad range of topics on the exam, it would be very difficult or impossible to pass the exam for someone who just “crammed” to pass the exam with little or no real-world Agile experience
    • Even if you could do that, simply “cramming” to pass the exam would have very limited value because it would have little credibility without some real-world experience to go along with it
  2. Just getting a PMI-ACP certification is not likely to be a “ticket” to getting a job as a project manager in an Agile environment for a  couple of reasons:
    • PMI-ACP is just a test of general Agile and Lean knowledge – it’s not designed to test your ability to perform a particular Agile role
    • The role of an Agile Project Manager is not well-defined and there is also some controversy that there is a role for a project manager in an Agile environment at all

I think it’s a mistake for anyone to think that getting PMI-ACP certification is just a matter of going out and passing the exam and getting a job in an Agile environment and people have to develop more realistic expectations about it.  I recommend:

  1. Understand the roles that an Agile Project Manager can potentially play in the real-world, develop a vision for yourself of what that target role is, and understand the overall “road map” for moving into that role.
  2. Understand how PMI-ACP relates to other Agile certifications and where it fits into that road map.  For example, a project manager who is new to an Agile environment may have to start out in a Scrum Master role to get some experience and PMI-ACP isn’t the best approach to become a Scrum Master – CSM or PSM is much better-suited for getting into that kind of role as a first step
  3. Don’t limit your focus to simply passing the exam – focus on developing solid, credible, real-world experience and use the PMI-ACP certification exam to validate that you do have the knowledge and experience needed to perform that role

I’ve just developed a new training course for project managers called “How to Prepare for PMI-ACP Certification” that elaborates on this to help project managers develop a strategy for themselves and helps them understand how to position my other Agile Project Management courses in this strategy.  You can find information on this course and my other Agile Project Management courses at the following location:

How to Prepare for PMI-ACP Certification

For a limited amount of time, I’m offering this course for only $5!

Preparing for the PMI-ACP Exam

Preparing for the PMI-ACP exam should not be an end-in-itself in my opinion…developing the knowledge and skills to do the job is what’s important. I’ve been engaged in some discussion lately on the PMI-ACP® certification and it caused me to do some research into how I can potentially help people prepare for the PMI-ACP® certification. I was among the earliest group of people to obtain the PMI-ACP® certification three years ago in 2012, I’ve published three books on Agile Project Management, and I’ve developed a number of online training courses on Agile Project Management. All of that effort has been focused around helping project managers successfully make the transition to a real-world Agile Project Management role and not specifically focused on helping people prepare for the PMI-ACP® exam; however, I do realize that having certifications can be valuable to help people get a job so I decided to do some analysis to see what, if anything, I could do to help people prepare for PMI-ACP certification.

First, let me explain my philosophy with regard to certifications in general. A lot of people chase after certifications to build up their resume. They cram for taking certification exams using a lot of rote memorization and focus on simply passing the exam. I’m not an advocate of that approach. I believe that the right approach is to build your knowledge and skills through training, self-directed study, and on-the-job experience to gain a solid foundation of the knowledge needed to do the job; and then, as a second step, take the certification exam to validate that you really do have the knowledge that you think you have.

Passing a certification exam should not be an end-in-itself in my opinion…developing the knowledge and skills to do the job is what’s important and a certification exam can be a good way of validating that you do have the knowledge and skills. One of the problems with the PMI-ACP exam; however, is it isn’t oriented around a particular job – it’s more of a test of general knowledge associated with Agile and Lean and isn’t really directly associated with a specific job role. That’s a very important consideration to recognize that getting through PMI-ACP® doesn’t really directly qualify you for a specific job. The role that an Agile Project Manager plays in the real world is not well-defined and it is even somewhat controversial among some Agile people that there is a role for an Agile Project Manager at all. I sat in on a presentation by a very well-known Agile consultant and book author a few years ago who made the statement that “An Agile Project Manager is an Oxymoron”.

There are a lot of PMI-ACP® exam prep courses out there but I’ve taken a different approach. I specifically didn’t want to develop an “exam prep” course for the reasons I mentioned above. I decided instead to focus on better defining the actual roles that an Agile Project Manager might play in the real world and designing online training around helping people prepare for those roles. My “Mastering Agile Project Management” course, for example, has a lot of material that defines the potential roles an Agile Project Manager is likely to play and some actual case studies showing how those roles are implemented in real world situations. That isn’t really an “exam prep” course per se, but I think it helps someone develop into a role to get the real world experience needed to qualify to take the certification exam.

Don’t forget that one of the requirements to take the PMI-ACP® exam is that someone has at least 2,000 hours of project management experience; and, in addition to that, has at least 1,500 hours working in an Agile environment. I think that’s a good requirement and it’s specifically designed to prevent someone from going out and cramming to get through the exam based primarily on rote memorization of information.

So, over the past few days, I did a gap analysis to compare the information in my online Agile Project Management courses to the material that is covered in the PMI-ACP® exam. To do that analysis, I looked at:

  • The PMI-ACP® Examination Content Outline
  • The outlines of several PMI-ACP® exam preparation courses
  • Mike Grifiths’ book PMI-ACP® Exam Prep Book
  • Plus numerous other books that are on the recommended reading list to prepare for the exam and many others I consider essential that are not on that list at all but should be (like latest book, The Project Manager’s Guide to Mastering Agile)
  • What I found from this analysis was that the material required for the PMI-ACP® exam fell into two categories:

    1. Information that is generally useful in an actual real-world Agile Project Management role, and
    2. Information that may have little or no value in the real world, but you have to know because it might be on the exam. Examples of information in this category include:
      • How many people really practice earned value management in an Agile environment?
      • How many people really do an elaborate quantitative value analysis based on NPR, IRR, etc. to optimize the value stream of an Agile project?

    The results of that analysis convinced me that:

    • I already cover most of the topics in category #1 above (topics that are really important in the real world); however, there are a few items that I think have real-world value that will further enhance my Agile Project Management courses. So, over the next few weeks, I will be beefing up my courses to more thoroughly cover those additional areas. The good news is that anyone who is currently enrolled in my courses or has taken my courses in the past will get the benefit of this new information at no additional cost.
    • I definitely don’t want to try to make my courses into an “exam prep” course because I would have to bog down the student in a lot of the information that is in category #2 above because it might be on the exam, even though it may have little or no real-world value
    • If you’re thinking about going for PMI-ACP® certification, my recommendation is don’t do it just to “get your ticket punched” that you have the certification. First go out and get the knowledge and experience required to fill an Agile Project Management role in the real world and then use the PMI-ACP® to validate that you do have that knowledge. The courses I’ve developed are not “exam prep” courses, but they are very well-aligned with that strategy which I think is a good strategy to pursue. When you do get to that point that you do have the knowledge and experience to take the exam, there are a number of resources to help you prepare to take the exam. In particular, I think Mike Griffiths’ book is a good resource but passing the exam and getting the certification shouldn’t be an end-in-itself. That’s only the final step in proving that you have successfully acquired that real-world knowledge and experience.

      Here’s a short video that explains how my courses can help you prepare to develop the knowledge and skills needed to qualify for PMI-ACP® certification:

      Preparing for the PMI-ACP Certification and Beyond,/p>

      It’s important to recognize that Agile is going to cause a major transformation of the project management profession over a period of time and I don’t think that anyone (including PMI) has figured out what the full impact of that transformation will be over time and the PMI-ACP® is only the first step towards making that transformation. It is a good certification and it is a step in the right direction but it is only a test of general Agile knowledge and doesn’t address the primary challenge that many project managers face of learning how to blend Agile and traditional project management principles and practices together in the right proportions to fit a given situation. That’s the challenge my courses are designed to address.

What’s Next After PMI-ACP?

I recently participated in a forum on PMI-ACP® when someone asked “What’s Next After PMI-ACP?”. I thought it was an interesting discussion and is worth elaborating on further. I believe that the individual who asked the question was wondering what new certifications PMI is going to come out with for people who have a PMI-ACP certificattion and are interested in continuing to advance their knowledge and career in that direction.

It’s a perfectly understandable question but, unfortunately, the answer may not be what you might want to hear. It raises a much larger question of what’s an “Agile Project Manager”? and what’s the career path for someone who has a project management background and is interested in developing into an Agile Project Management role? Many project managers have been thinking that PMI-ACP® would open up a new career path into Agile and it’s just a matter of getting another certification to move further, but I don’t believe that to be the case for a couple of reasons:

  • The role of an “Agile Project Manager” is not well-defined and is also somewhat controversial at this point in time. it’s very difficult to certify someone to have those skills when they are not well defined and contentious.
  • The PMI-ACP® certification tests general knowledge about Agile and Lean and is not designed around a specific role like the CSM (Certified Scrum Master) certification is.
  • Agile is much more heavily based on “tacit” knowledge versus “explicit” knowledge. It requires a lot more judgment and it’s not something that you can easily codify in a document like PMBOK that you can test and certify people against. For that reason, even if the idea of an “Agile Project Manager” was more well-understood, it still might be very difficult to develop a certification exam to test that someone really has the skills to fill that role.

The PMI-ACP certification is a great step in the right direction by PMI to try to close the gap between traditional plan-driven project management and Agile but it just doesn’t go far enough and it also leaves open some very large questions that any project manager who is interested in Agile would naturally want to have answered about what their career path is. Agile is rapidly changing the whole “ball game” for project managers and it’s very understandable that project managers have questions about what their career direction is.

The truth is that any project manager who has a PMI-ACP® certification who wants to further develop into an Agile Project Management role has to be somewhat of a “pioneer” to lead the way for other project managers at this point in time. It can be a difficult transformation, it’s certainly not a matter of just getting another certification, and the ultimate role you wind up in may be very different from a conventional notion of what “project management” is. You have to be a real self-starter to start out on that journey but I think it’s a survival issue for many people in the project management profession to move in that direction.

I am passionate about helping project managers move in this direction and I’ve developed some training courses to help. Check out this video for a summary of the training courses I’ve developed and how I think they help people make this transformation:

What’s Next Beyond PMI-ACP®?

This is a difficult problem but I believe that this is critical to the future of the project management profession and I’m determined to help project managers make this transformation. You can find more detailed information on any of my training courses here:

Agile Project Management Training Course Details