Category Archives: Agile Project Management Training

My Methodology is Better than Your Methodology

There are a lot of people who get caught up in what I call “methodology wars” where they are intent on their position that my methodology is better than your methodology and whatever methodology they advocate is better at solving any problem you can possibly imagine than any other methodology. You can see this in the many “agile versus waterfall” discussions and other discussions where SAFe, Kanban, or some other methodology/framework is positioned as a “silver bullet” for any problem you might have. They also tend to ignore all other methodologies as obsolete or irrelevant.

The truth is that all methodologies and frameworks have strengths and weaknesses depending on the situation and the right approach is to fit the methodology to the situation rather than force-fitting a problem to some pre-defined methodology. Sometimes that may require customizing a methodology to fit the problem and/or using a combination of elements from different methodologies. It’s a lot more difficult to do that, but it can be done – it requires:

  • Knowledge of a broader range of methodologies and frameworks,
  • Ability to see the strengths and weaknesses of those methodologies objectively, and
  • A deeper understanding of the principles behind those methodologies to know how they might be combined to fit a given situation

Here’s an example – I just finished adding some material on “Lean Software Development” to my online training courses on Agile Project Management.  Lean is not widely-used as a standalone methodology and it clearly didn’t win the “methodology wars” but the principles behind lean are the foundation for all Agile methodologies including Scrum.  If you look at the principles behind lean, they may appear to be at odds with other Agile methodologies:

  • Lean heavily emphasizes eliminating waste in a process to improve efficiency, while
  • Agile is more heavily-focused on taking a flexible and adaptive approach to meet customer needs and is less concerned about just eliminating waste

If you pursued each of these goals in isolation and to an extreme; they might be in conflict with each other, but if they are blended together in the right proportions to fit a given situation, they can be very complementary rather than competitive.

Here’s another example – many people seem to believe that all forms of traditional project management are obsolete and irrelevant and have been totally replaced by Agile.  On the surface; if you look at traditional, plan-driven project management and Agile, they may appear to be at odds with each other; and if each approach is pursued in isolation and to an extreme, they probably will be in conflict but that shouldn’t preclude blending the principles behind the two approaches together in the right proportions to fit a given situation.

This kind of thinking is commonly called “Systems thinking” – it requires seeing a problem in a holistic context and understanding the dynamics of the problem at a deeper level rather than mechanically imposing a predefined solution on a given problem.  This is the kind of approach I’ve tried to help students develop in all of my online Agile Project Management training courses.

The New PMI PDU System

The New PMI PDU System has raised a number of questions. As many people may know, PMI has recently announced some significant changes in the process for claiming and reporting PDU’s. This new change went into effect on December 1, 2015. With this new change, PDU’s need to be split into three different categories:

  • Technical
  • Leadership
  • Strategic & Business Management

In addition, each major certification (e.g., PMP, PMI-ACP) requires you to achieve a certain number of PDU’s in each of these categories in order to renew your certification (Total number of PDU’s is no longer sufficient).

I applaud this change. It is going in absolutely the right direction to elevate the project management profession and is very much in line with the direction I’ve been developing in my own courses. The thinking behind this change is that a project manager can no longer be just a technical administrator who manages project plans and schedules and that sort of thing. The essence of this change is that, in addition to that kind of technical project management role, a project manager must also have:

  • Strong leadership skills (not just simply coordinate resources from a variety of functional departments) and
  • Be able to play a value-added role that connects projects with driving strategic business goals (not just simply meeting project requirements and controlling budgets and schedules)

It’s very apparent to me that we are in the midst of a major transformation of the whole project management profession and you can see this clearly with Agile:

  • The role of a project manager at the team level in a true Agile environment does not exist anymore in many environments, and
  • If there is a role for a project manager, at all, in an Agile environment, it is a very different kind of role and may be at a higher level that requires strong people leadership skills as well as the ability to help define a project management approach that is well-aligned with the company’s business

These are exactly the challenges I have tried to address in all of my courses to help the project management profession move in this direction!  All of my courses are eligible for PDU’s and you can find more information on all of my courses at the following location:

http://managedagile.com/training-courses/

Agile Project Management Book of Knowledge

Will there ever be an “Agile Project Management Book of Knowledge”? I’ve written several posts on comparing Agile and PMBOK.  It’s something like comparing apples and oranges:

  • PMBOK is over 500 pages long and attempts to provide a detailed checklist of guidelines for almost any conceivable situation involving project management.
  • Agile takes a totally different approach – defining some basic values and principles and leaving a lot of room for interpreting those values and principles in the context of the situation you’re in (at least that’s the way it is meant to be implemented, in my opinion).

For that reason, I don’t think that there will ever be an Agile version of PMBOK; however, I think there is value in having at least an outline of topic areas that are important for people to know about who are interested in assuming an Agile Project Management role.  Here’s what led me to that conclusion…

I’m developing a complete learning path consisting of about a dozen training courses for PMI-ACP certification.  This is not a typical “exam prep” course – I am totally against many of the “exam cram” courses that are on the market that are just focused on helping students cram some knowledge just to get through passing the PMI-ACP exam and not much more.  My philosophy is that people who are sincerely interested in becoming an excellent Agile Project Manager need to go well beyond passing the PMI-ACP exam and think well beyond simply obtaining PMI-ACP certification for a number of reasons:

  • The PMI-ACP exam is very limited in scope – it doesn’t address some of the things that I think are really important for an Agile Project Manager to know like how to integrate Agile and plan-driven approaches in the right proportions to fit a given situation.
  • The PMI-ACP exam also has a lot of useless and outdated information in it.  For example, how many people use the “Crystal” methodology any more?
  • It also relies heavily on some reference books that are also very outdated – Jim Highsmith’s book on Agile Project Management which was originally published in 2004 and republished in 2009 is one that PMI treats like the “Bible” of Agile Project Management.   I have a lot of respect for Jim Highsmith – he really was a very early pioneer in developing the initial concept of Agile Project Management but the thinking about what “Agile Project Management” is has evolved a lot since that time.
  • PMI also seems to have the delusion that you can just superimpose many traditional plan-driven concepts on top of Agile and I don’t believe that to be the case.  Agile really requires rethinking a lot of things we’ve taken for granted about project management for a long time, it really requires a very different way of thinking, and many well-accepted project management practices just aren’t very appropriate and/or useful in an Agile environment .  Here are a couple of examples of that:
    • The PMI-ACP exam requires you to know a lot about how to do complicated financial return calculations such as NPV, IRR, ROI, etc. – there seems to be an implication that an Agile Project Manager would really use that in the real world and I doubt that to be the case.  You rarely would know enough about a project upfront to do that kind of sophisticated financial analysis on an Agile project.
    • Earned Value Management is another example – how many people have ever used EVM on an Agile project?  The concept isn’t bad, but making it work in actual practice is almost impossible for many of the same reasons as the sophisticated financial analysis tools.  I have used EVM once for a government project because we were required to use it and report progress against earned value metrics but it was a joke…people had to play a lot of games with the numbers to satisfy the government’s requirements for EVM reporting.

All that being said, I think there is some value in PMI-ACP certification and passing the exam because it has gained some recognition and it is certainly a lot better than some of the other alternatives (Don’t get me started on talking about the CSM certification). However, you just need to realize that there’s a lot of useless information that you have to know just to pass the exam and you also need to be realistic enough to recognize that becoming a really effective Agile Project Manager it isn’t just a matter of passing the exam and getting the PMI-ACP certification.

The overall learning path I’m developing is built around those assumptions.  It is designed to give someone the knowledge that they need to pass the PMI-ACP exam (including a lot of information that I think is useless in the real world but you have to know because its on the exam), but the real focus is well beyond that and on giving someone the knowledge that they need to be a really good Agile Project Manager.

Another major problem I’ve had to deal with is that, in my opinion, the current way that the areas covered on the PMI-ACP exam are defined and organized is very disjoint, not well-organized, and incomplete.

  • The “Domains and Tasks” that are covered on the exam don’t exactly map to the other areas of “Knowledge and Skills” and
  • The “Knowledge and Skills” areas don’t map very well to the topics in “Tools and Techniques”.
  • I think PMI will also acknowledge that the topics in all of those areas are not meant to be a complete list – they are only representative examples of potential topics in that area.   PMI points to a number of reference books that are suggested reading and almost anything in any one of those reference books is fair game for being on the exam even though some of those books are fairly old and the list hasn’t been updated in some time.

To deal with that challenge, in planning for developing the overall learning path I’m working on, I needed to create a well-organized outline of topics that I thought needed to be covered.  As I develop the new courses in the current learning path I’m developing, I will be cross-referencing the material in those courses against that topic outline.   This topic outline is a “work in progress” at the moment; I’m sure that it is not anywhere near 100% complete, but I would be willing to share it with anyone who would like to review it and give me your comments and suggestions to help further develop this topic outline.  Here’s the kind of input I’m looking for:

  • Is it complete?  What topics have I left off that are important either for passing the PMI-ACP exam or for a real-world Agile Project Management role?
  • Do you agree with how it is organized?  I’ve tried to develop one overall integrated topic list that is much more consistent and well integrated than the way the various PMI-ACP exam topics are organized.
  • What other suggestions do you have for further developing this topic list?

If you’re interested in reviewing this list and providing feedback, please send me an e-mail and I’ll send you a copy to review.  Please don’t ask for a copy unless you are seriously committed to reviewing this document and providing feedback:

Send email to Chuck

How to Prepare for PMI-ACP Certification

I think there is a lot of confusion among project managers about how to prepare for PMI-ACP certification – some people may think that:

  1. Getting PMI-ACP certification is a matter of buying an “exam prep” book or taking an “exam prep” training course and then going out and taking the exam, and
  2. Once you’ve taken and passed the exam, that is your “ticket” to get a job working in an Agile environment as a project manager

Both of those assumptions are far from reality, in my opinion:

  1. You can’t just do some “exam prep” training and/or buy an “exam prep” book and go out and pass the exam for several reasons:
    • PMI won’t allow that – PMI requires a  minimum of 1,500 hours of working in an Agile environment before you can even apply to take the exam
    • There’s such a broad range of topics on the exam, it would be very difficult or impossible to pass the exam for someone who just “crammed” to pass the exam with little or no real-world Agile experience
    • Even if you could do that, simply “cramming” to pass the exam would have very limited value because it would have little credibility without some real-world experience to go along with it
  2. Just getting a PMI-ACP certification is not likely to be a “ticket” to getting a job as a project manager in an Agile environment for a  couple of reasons:
    • PMI-ACP is just a test of general Agile and Lean knowledge – it’s not designed to test your ability to perform a particular Agile role
    • The role of an Agile Project Manager is not well-defined and there is also some controversy that there is a role for a project manager in an Agile environment at all

I think it’s a mistake for anyone to think that getting PMI-ACP certification is just a matter of going out and passing the exam and getting a job in an Agile environment and people have to develop more realistic expectations about it.  I recommend:

  1. Understand the roles that an Agile Project Manager can potentially play in the real-world, develop a vision for yourself of what that target role is, and understand the overall “road map” for moving into that role.
  2. Understand how PMI-ACP relates to other Agile certifications and where it fits into that road map.  For example, a project manager who is new to an Agile environment may have to start out in a Scrum Master role to get some experience and PMI-ACP isn’t the best approach to become a Scrum Master – CSM or PSM is much better-suited for getting into that kind of role as a first step
  3. Don’t limit your focus to simply passing the exam – focus on developing solid, credible, real-world experience and use the PMI-ACP certification exam to validate that you do have the knowledge and experience needed to perform that role

I’ve just developed a new training course for project managers called “How to Prepare for PMI-ACP Certification” that elaborates on this to help project managers develop a strategy for themselves and helps them understand how to position my other Agile Project Management courses in this strategy.  You can find information on this course and my other Agile Project Management courses at the following location:

How to Prepare for PMI-ACP Certification

For a limited amount of time, I’m offering this course for only $5!

How Do You Go About Selling Agile?

A student in one of my courses asked if I could help him develop a short and succinct way of “How Do You Go About Selling Agile? I think it’s an excellent topic and I told him I would write up something on that. Here it is…

First, I don’t think that anyone should start with an objective of “selling Agile” to anyone. There are a lot of people out there who try to do that and I think it is fundamentally the wrong approach to try to convince someone to become more Agile rather than focusing on how becoming more Agile will help them and what problem it will solve.

I also very strongly believe that there is not a binary and mutually-exclusive choice between “Agile” and “Waterfall”; and, rather than attempting to force-fit a business or project to one of those extremes, you have to go in the other direction and fit the methodology (whatever it might be – Agile or plan-driven or some combination of both) to the situation. It takes a lot more skill to do that but it definitely can be done. It requires:

  • A broader knowledge of different methodologies (both Agile or adaptive and plan-driven) and an ability to see past many of the stereotypes, myths, and misconceptions that exist about what’s commonly referred to as “Agile” and “Waterfall” to see those two approaches in a fresh, new perspective as being complementary to each other rather than competitive and to objectively understand the strengths and weaknesses of both approaches
  • The ability to take a “systems thinking” approach to see those methodologies in a broader context beyond just a development process perspective of how they relate to an overall business and what problems they might solve
  • In addition to all of that, you also need to understand the principles behind the methodologies at a deeper level (rather than just the mechanics of how to perform the methodology) to understand how to blend different, seemingly disparate methodologies together as needed to fit a given situation

I’ve developed a set of online training courses that are specifically designed to help prepare people for those challenges, you can check that out here:

Agile Project Management Training Courses

However, if you’re trying to “sell” a manager on becoming more agile, he/she probably doesn’t have all of those skills and they’re probably not willing to sit through a series of training courses to develop those skills either; so, how do you develop a relatively simple “elevator speech” to help someone understand why they should even consider becoming more Agile?  Here are some thoughts on that:

  1. First, you have to look at it from an overall business perspective , not from a more limited development process perspective. It’s very easy to get “tunnel vision” with Agile – we get so enthusiastic about the benefits of Agile from a development process perspective that we assume that what’s good for the development process must be good for the company as a whole and that’s not necessarily the case. Rather than attempting to force-fit a company to an Agile approach; you may have to craft an approach that is more well-aligned with the primary success factors that drive the company’s business and becoming more Agile may or may not be the most important factor in the company’s overall business success.
  2. Second, you have to recognize that some companies are scared to death of Agile – they’re afraid of losing control and that fear is not totally unfounded if the Agile approach is not well-designed and managed. So, you may need to start off with more of a hybrid approach as an initial first step to demonstrate success rather than going full-bore into a complete corporate Agile transformation. You also need to recognize that an Agile transformation can take a long time and demands a lot of patience and perseverance.
  3. Finally, nothing sells better than results. Work on developing good results and that will sell itself.

Although the benefits of adopting a more agile approach will vary from one company to another, there are some general benefits that apply, to some extent, to any company. Here are the key general benefits I would focus on in my “elevator speech”…

  • Adaptability – The biggest and most general benefit is adaptability – regardless of whatever other benefits an agile approach might provide, no one is likely to argue that there’s a big advantage in being able to tailor an approach to fit a project and a business rather than force-fitting all projects to a traditional, plan-driven project management approach
  • Time-to-market – Probably the next most important general benefit is time-to-market – a lot of people have the impression that an Agile project is always faster and that’s generally true but not always true. The real emphasis in Agile, in my opinion, is keeping the customer closely-engaged with the project as it progresses to ensure that what you’re developing really meets their needs. Sometimes that may actually take longer because it may involve some trial-and-error. However, very few people could argue that prioritizing requirements and delivering functionality incrementally rather than waiting to deliver the entire project all at once can significantly accelerate progress even if you don’t take a full Agile approach.
  • Reduced Costs – Another big factor is reduced costs associated with reducing unnecessary overhead in projects. This is another one that doesn’t require adopting a full Agile development approach to achieve – all it requires is taking a hard look at some of the documentation and other artifacts and controls used in a project and deciding whether they really produce value or not and who they produce value for.
  • Customer SatisfactionFinally, as I’ve mentioned, the big selling point of Agile is the improved customer satisfaction you get from having a customer directly engaged in the project to ensure that the project really solves their business problem and provides an appropriate level of value to them

The key point to emphasize is that all of these are relatively tangible benefits that can be realized, to some extent, on any project simply by using more of an “Agile Mindset” and it doesn’t necessarily require adopting a full-blown textbook Agile approach like Scrum and/or risk losing control of your business to get some of these benefits. Also, in addition to those more tangible benefits, there are also a lot of intangible benefits such as:

  • Improved employee productivity and morale that results from more empowered teams
  • Improved organizational synergy that results from higher levels of collaboration, trust, and shared responsibility within the organization

I want to add one note to this post that came out of some follow-up discussions we had on LinkedIn on this post…The word “selling” has a variety of different connotations. Some people regard “selling” as a manipulative process to convince someone to buy something they don’t want (like life insurance or used cars).

Years ago when I was a Program Manager in a large computer company, part of the training to become a Program Manager was a course called “Solution Selling” which was basically a consultative approach to “selling”. It created a different approach to “selling” – instead of going in to a client to sell them something like “Agile”, the “solution selling” approach is to go in to the customer and do a lot active listening to understand their problem before attempting to sell any solution. I think that’s the right approach with Agile also. There are people out there who get overly-zealous about “selling” Agile to the extent that “Agile” becomes a solution to any problem you might have. That’s the wrong approach, in my opinion.

Agile Project Management Roadmap

I recently published an article on “Preparing for the PMI-ACP® Exam“. I want to expand on that article in the broader context of: What is the “Agile Project Management Roadmap” for a Project Manager with little or no Agile experience to become a well-qualified Agile Project Manager and where does PMI-ACP® certification fit into that process? Here’s a simplified, high-level diagram that shows what I think that process looks like and how the online training I’ve developed fits into that “road map”:

Agile Project Management Training Roadmap

Here’s some notes on this “road map”

  • It’s important to recognize that the typical Project Manager who has little or no Agile experience can’t just go out and take the PMI-ACP certification exam (even if they took at least 21 hours of training first), you need at least 1,500 hours of experience in an Agile environment to qualify to take the exam
  • In order to get 1,500 hours experience in an Agile environment, you need some knowledge to be able to perform that role. That’s the primary need that my current online training courses fill. Those courses provide an excellent foundation and an equivalent level of knowledge for most of the topics required for PMI-ACP but it’s more focused on preparing someone to assume a real-world role rather than “exam prep” training
  • After you get the 1,500 hours of experience, you need to take an exam-prep course before you can take the PMI-ACP® exam. A total of at least 21 hours of training is required to qualify to take the exam. My courses, as they exist now, will satisfy about 7.5 hours of this requirement
  • Finally, it’s important to recognize that getting PMI-ACP® certification doesn’t immediately give someone the skills to get a job. PMI-ACP® certification is a test of general Agile knowledge and is not oriented around qualifying someone to perform a particular role. This is a very controversial topic; but, in general, there is no role for an Agile Project Manager at the team level in an Agile environment, the typical role for an Agile Project Manager would be at a higher enterprise level and PMI-ACP® definitely does not prepare someone for that role. That’s requires additional training beyond the level of PMI-ACP® certification and that’s the need my Advanced Agile PM Training course are designed to satisfy.

It’s very important to recognize that Agile will precipitate a dramatic transformation of the Project Management profession as we know it today and PMI-ACP® certification is a good step in the right direction but I think most people will agree that it’s just a test of general Agile knowledge and doesn’t go far enough to prepare project managers for a specific Agile Project Management role and to address the real challenge that many project managers face of “How do I blend Agile and traditional Project Management” principles and practices in the right proportions to fit a given situation?”

Preparing for the PMI-ACP Exam

Preparing for the PMI-ACP exam should not be an end-in-itself in my opinion…developing the knowledge and skills to do the job is what’s important. I’ve been engaged in some discussion lately on the PMI-ACP® certification and it caused me to do some research into how I can potentially help people prepare for the PMI-ACP® certification. I was among the earliest group of people to obtain the PMI-ACP® certification three years ago in 2012, I’ve published three books on Agile Project Management, and I’ve developed a number of online training courses on Agile Project Management. All of that effort has been focused around helping project managers successfully make the transition to a real-world Agile Project Management role and not specifically focused on helping people prepare for the PMI-ACP® exam; however, I do realize that having certifications can be valuable to help people get a job so I decided to do some analysis to see what, if anything, I could do to help people prepare for PMI-ACP certification.

First, let me explain my philosophy with regard to certifications in general. A lot of people chase after certifications to build up their resume. They cram for taking certification exams using a lot of rote memorization and focus on simply passing the exam. I’m not an advocate of that approach. I believe that the right approach is to build your knowledge and skills through training, self-directed study, and on-the-job experience to gain a solid foundation of the knowledge needed to do the job; and then, as a second step, take the certification exam to validate that you really do have the knowledge that you think you have.

Passing a certification exam should not be an end-in-itself in my opinion…developing the knowledge and skills to do the job is what’s important and a certification exam can be a good way of validating that you do have the knowledge and skills. One of the problems with the PMI-ACP exam; however, is it isn’t oriented around a particular job – it’s more of a test of general knowledge associated with Agile and Lean and isn’t really directly associated with a specific job role. That’s a very important consideration to recognize that getting through PMI-ACP® doesn’t really directly qualify you for a specific job. The role that an Agile Project Manager plays in the real world is not well-defined and it is even somewhat controversial among some Agile people that there is a role for an Agile Project Manager at all. I sat in on a presentation by a very well-known Agile consultant and book author a few years ago who made the statement that “An Agile Project Manager is an Oxymoron”.

There are a lot of PMI-ACP® exam prep courses out there but I’ve taken a different approach. I specifically didn’t want to develop an “exam prep” course for the reasons I mentioned above. I decided instead to focus on better defining the actual roles that an Agile Project Manager might play in the real world and designing online training around helping people prepare for those roles. My “Mastering Agile Project Management” course, for example, has a lot of material that defines the potential roles an Agile Project Manager is likely to play and some actual case studies showing how those roles are implemented in real world situations. That isn’t really an “exam prep” course per se, but I think it helps someone develop into a role to get the real world experience needed to qualify to take the certification exam.

Don’t forget that one of the requirements to take the PMI-ACP® exam is that someone has at least 2,000 hours of project management experience; and, in addition to that, has at least 1,500 hours working in an Agile environment. I think that’s a good requirement and it’s specifically designed to prevent someone from going out and cramming to get through the exam based primarily on rote memorization of information.

So, over the past few days, I did a gap analysis to compare the information in my online Agile Project Management courses to the material that is covered in the PMI-ACP® exam. To do that analysis, I looked at:

  • The PMI-ACP® Examination Content Outline
  • The outlines of several PMI-ACP® exam preparation courses
  • Mike Grifiths’ book PMI-ACP® Exam Prep Book
  • Plus numerous other books that are on the recommended reading list to prepare for the exam and many others I consider essential that are not on that list at all but should be (like latest book, The Project Manager’s Guide to Mastering Agile)
  • What I found from this analysis was that the material required for the PMI-ACP® exam fell into two categories:

    1. Information that is generally useful in an actual real-world Agile Project Management role, and
    2. Information that may have little or no value in the real world, but you have to know because it might be on the exam. Examples of information in this category include:
      • How many people really practice earned value management in an Agile environment?
      • How many people really do an elaborate quantitative value analysis based on NPR, IRR, etc. to optimize the value stream of an Agile project?

    The results of that analysis convinced me that:

    • I already cover most of the topics in category #1 above (topics that are really important in the real world); however, there are a few items that I think have real-world value that will further enhance my Agile Project Management courses. So, over the next few weeks, I will be beefing up my courses to more thoroughly cover those additional areas. The good news is that anyone who is currently enrolled in my courses or has taken my courses in the past will get the benefit of this new information at no additional cost.
    • I definitely don’t want to try to make my courses into an “exam prep” course because I would have to bog down the student in a lot of the information that is in category #2 above because it might be on the exam, even though it may have little or no real-world value
    • If you’re thinking about going for PMI-ACP® certification, my recommendation is don’t do it just to “get your ticket punched” that you have the certification. First go out and get the knowledge and experience required to fill an Agile Project Management role in the real world and then use the PMI-ACP® to validate that you do have that knowledge. The courses I’ve developed are not “exam prep” courses, but they are very well-aligned with that strategy which I think is a good strategy to pursue. When you do get to that point that you do have the knowledge and experience to take the exam, there are a number of resources to help you prepare to take the exam. In particular, I think Mike Griffiths’ book is a good resource but passing the exam and getting the certification shouldn’t be an end-in-itself. That’s only the final step in proving that you have successfully acquired that real-world knowledge and experience.

      Here’s a short video that explains how my courses can help you prepare to develop the knowledge and skills needed to qualify for PMI-ACP® certification:

      Preparing for the PMI-ACP Certification and Beyond,/p>

      It’s important to recognize that Agile is going to cause a major transformation of the project management profession over a period of time and I don’t think that anyone (including PMI) has figured out what the full impact of that transformation will be over time and the PMI-ACP® is only the first step towards making that transformation. It is a good certification and it is a step in the right direction but it is only a test of general Agile knowledge and doesn’t address the primary challenge that many project managers face of learning how to blend Agile and traditional project management principles and practices together in the right proportions to fit a given situation. That’s the challenge my courses are designed to address.

Understanding Agile at a Deeper Level

Understanding Agile at a Deeper Level is important. One of the criticisms I’ve heard often about Agile/Scrum is that people do it “mechanically” – sometimes, they rigidly and dogmatically implement Scrum “by the book”. That’s very ironic because it’s the opposite of what was intended by the Agile Manifesto (remember “Individuals and interactions over processes and tools”). That shouldn’t be surprising – you can get a Certified Scrum Master (CSM) certificate by sitting through a two-day course and many people never go beyond that level of training.

In my opinion, to develop a high-performance Agile/Scrum approach that is dynamic and adaptable to a broad range of situations, you have to go beyond doing it “mechanically by the book” and understand the principles and values behind it at a deeper level. This becomes particularly important when you try to scale Agile/Scrum to larger and more complex enterprise-level projects.

I’ve developed a new online training course to help fill this need and I’m offering this course at a discounted price of $10 for anyone who wants to take it during the month of June. Here’s a brief video summary of this new online training course:

Understanding Agile at a Deeper Level Video Summary

You can find more information on this course plus the discount coupon code on this blog site training page:

Understanding Agile at a Deeper Level Course Information

If you’re interested in certification, this course should be excellent preparation for the Professional Scrum Master (PSM) certification. I think the PSM certification is more rigorous than CSM and it recognizes that training and development should be an ongoing process beyond simply sitting through a one-time, two-day training course.

Advanced Agile Project Management Training

As many of you who have been following my blog post realize, I’m very passionate about closing the gap between the project management community and the Agile community and helping people see these two approaches as complementary rather than competitive. To that end, I’ve published three books on Agile Project Management and I’ve written over 60 articles in this blog site. However, I’m determined to go beyond that and develop an online Advanced Agile Project Management training curriculum that condenses a lot of that knowledge into a well-organized set of training courses that are easy to follow and understand. There are several needs that I’m trying to satisfy with those courses:

  1. Project Managers – Many project managers are unsure about the impact of Agile on the project management profession as well as on their own career direction.

    There are many project managers who have been heavily indoctrinated in a traditional, plan-driven approach to project management and see no need to learn anything about Agile. Agile is perceived to be something that is relevant only to software development and can be ignored by anyone who is not working in that area.I believe that Agile is a fundamental shift in thinking that applies, to some extent, to any area and learning how to integrate Agile principles and practices in the right proportions with a traditional plan-driven approach will make someone a stronger project manager even if they are never involved in a pure Agile project.

    It's a matter of learning to be adaptive and fitting the methodology to the project rather than using a "one size fits all" approach to force-fit all projects to a traditional, plan-driven approach.

    There are some project managers who may think it is just a matter of getting another certification such as PMI-ACP and they're done as soon as they get that certification.I think PMI-ACP is a step in the right direction but I don't think it goes far enough. PMI-ACP is mostly a test of your understanding of basic Agile and lean terminology.

    It doesn't address the real challenge that many project managers face of figuring out how to integrate Agile and traditional plan-driven principles and practices in the right proportions to fit a given situation.

    A key objective of the training I’ve developed is to help project managers develop a more adaptive approach to project management that integrates Agile as well as traditional plan-driven project management principles and practices in the right proportions to fit any situation. I do not believe that traditional plan-driven project principles and practices are obsolete and no longer needed; however, I do believe that any project manager who only knows how to do traditional plan-driven project management will be very limited in the not-too-distant future.

  2. Business Managers – Many project managers are a product of the environment that they work in and their organization’s management approach is heavily rooted in a plan-driven approach to project management.
    • The organization expects project managers to take charge of projects and to do whatever is needed to manage and control a project to make it successful. If a project is in trouble or fails, the project manager is the one held responsible. Naturally, that would tend to lead a project manager to take a “command-and-control” approach to managing projects.
    • There is also typically a heavy emphasis on management of project costs and schedules and a project that goes significantly over its schedule and cost goals is likely to be regarded as a failure. That would also naturally tend to favor a “Waterfall” approach where the project locks in the requirements upfront and does not encourage making changes once the project is in progress.

    A project manager who works in that kind of environment will have difficulty developing a more adaptive approach to project management if that isn’t consistent with what the organization expects of him/her. Many of these organizations see it as a binary and mutually-exclusive choice between “Agile” and “Waterfall” and think they have to force-fit their business and projects to one of those extremes and they’re scared to death of adopting an Agile approach for fear of totally dismantling their existing management systems and completely losing control of their business.

    That’s a key reason why I developed the “Making Agile Work for Your Business” course so that project managers who are stuck in that kind of environment can use that training to influence their organization to understand how to fit an Agile Project Management approach to any business environment.

  3. Agile Teams – You might ask, “Why would an Agile team need to know anything about ‘project management’?” The answer to that question may not be obvious but there are several good reasons why Agile teams need to learn how to integrate some level of project management principles and practices into their work.
    • There’s a common misconception that “project management” isn’t required in an Agile project at the team level because you typically won’t find anyone with the title of “Project Manager” at that level. The truth is that there is still a need for “project management”; it’s just a much more adaptive approach to “project management” and the “project management” functions are distributed among the members of the team rather than being performed by one individual with the title of “Project Manager”. Even a developer or a tester on an Agile team has some very basic project management responsibilities for planning and managing their own tasks and collaboratively working with the rest of the team to integrate all of the work of the team around a common goal.
    • Many projects require some level of predictability and control in addition to being Agile. A good example of that is an Agile contracting situation where it is essential to manage a customer’s expectations regarding costs and schedules in addition to being agile.
    • Many people on an Agile team have been thrust into the role that they’re in with little or know training at all. They may know something about the “mechanics” of how to do Agile and Scrum but they typically may have no project management background at all and they may even see “project management” as inconsistent with an Agile development approach. My courses will also help people on Agile teams see this in a broader perspective and learn how to integrate an appropriate level of “project management” focus into their efforts on an Agile team.

What’s Next After PMI-ACP?

I recently participated in a forum on PMI-ACP® when someone asked “What’s Next After PMI-ACP?”. I thought it was an interesting discussion and is worth elaborating on further. I believe that the individual who asked the question was wondering what new certifications PMI is going to come out with for people who have a PMI-ACP certificattion and are interested in continuing to advance their knowledge and career in that direction.

It’s a perfectly understandable question but, unfortunately, the answer may not be what you might want to hear. It raises a much larger question of what’s an “Agile Project Manager”? and what’s the career path for someone who has a project management background and is interested in developing into an Agile Project Management role? Many project managers have been thinking that PMI-ACP® would open up a new career path into Agile and it’s just a matter of getting another certification to move further, but I don’t believe that to be the case for a couple of reasons:

  • The role of an “Agile Project Manager” is not well-defined and is also somewhat controversial at this point in time. it’s very difficult to certify someone to have those skills when they are not well defined and contentious.
  • The PMI-ACP® certification tests general knowledge about Agile and Lean and is not designed around a specific role like the CSM (Certified Scrum Master) certification is.
  • Agile is much more heavily based on “tacit” knowledge versus “explicit” knowledge. It requires a lot more judgment and it’s not something that you can easily codify in a document like PMBOK that you can test and certify people against. For that reason, even if the idea of an “Agile Project Manager” was more well-understood, it still might be very difficult to develop a certification exam to test that someone really has the skills to fill that role.

The PMI-ACP certification is a great step in the right direction by PMI to try to close the gap between traditional plan-driven project management and Agile but it just doesn’t go far enough and it also leaves open some very large questions that any project manager who is interested in Agile would naturally want to have answered about what their career path is. Agile is rapidly changing the whole “ball game” for project managers and it’s very understandable that project managers have questions about what their career direction is.

The truth is that any project manager who has a PMI-ACP® certification who wants to further develop into an Agile Project Management role has to be somewhat of a “pioneer” to lead the way for other project managers at this point in time. It can be a difficult transformation, it’s certainly not a matter of just getting another certification, and the ultimate role you wind up in may be very different from a conventional notion of what “project management” is. You have to be a real self-starter to start out on that journey but I think it’s a survival issue for many people in the project management profession to move in that direction.

I am passionate about helping project managers move in this direction and I’ve developed some training courses to help. Check out this video for a summary of the training courses I’ve developed and how I think they help people make this transformation:

What’s Next Beyond PMI-ACP®?

This is a difficult problem but I believe that this is critical to the future of the project management profession and I’m determined to help project managers make this transformation. You can find more detailed information on any of my training courses here:

Agile Project Management Training Course Details